What do you do? April 14th Edition

Friday, April 14- census records, Boss Baby, genealogy, and family time

Today, I did not work! I really don’t have a lot to report on, as I spent the day with the kids doing various things, so here’s the quick rundown:

Today I slept in, and it felt great! Once we were all awake, we really just hung out at home.  I didn’t even get to much housework today.  Ben went out with his respite worker for a few hours this afternoon, so Andrew and I decided to go over to Springbank Park.  He had a list of about 10 things he wants to do and considering most things were closed, that’s what we settled on.  Unfortunately for us, Springbank Park was being well used, and there was nowhere to park. We decided to come back home and formulate a plan for when Ben got home.  The top three things on his wish list were: Go-Karts, Bowling, or a movie.  Ben vetoed all but the movie. We made it to the 4:30 showing of Boss Baby – which did give me a few laughs and I enjoyed the popcorn!  Once home, we made a quick dinner, and the boys were off to bed.

Once home, we made a quick dinner, and the boys were off to bed.

I renewed my ancestry.ca membership and added global access.  I have done genealogy research for the past 15 or so years on and off but had really maxed out what I could research with my Canadian only membership, so once I post this, I’m heading back into census and immigration records for a few hours. Last year for Christmas, I compiled all of my research thus far and self-published books – one for my mom’s side and one for my dad’s, then gave them out at Christmas.  I’m hoping in the next few years that I can do a second edition, and include more of the interesting stories that I have come across.

For example, my dad’s family is from the East Coast – and Ireland before that on his dad’s side.  His mom’s side are actually one of the original colonial families in New England (which makes that family really easy to trace).  At one the borders between Maine and New Brunswick shifted frequently enough that one ancestor was denied his right to vote (for himself as an elected official) because his citizenship was determined to be invalid as he was born in Canada, but without moving, was an American and was therefore unable to vote for a position he held at the time.

While I’m still researching and verifying, it would not be surprising to me at this point, if I have deeper connections to the indigenous communities of Eastern Canada, such as the Passamaquoddy and Mi’kmaq First Nations than I have known before.  Many of the older census records are marked Native, especially for my descendants from Deer Island New Brunswick, however, that could also be the census takers error in implying born in New Brunswick.  I am sure that at some point through my research I will find out more.

On my mom’s side, one of her ancestors may have actually been the first female postmistress, serving in Duck Lake, after Jennie’s husband was killed during the Riel Rebellion by Almighty Voice.  There was no one willing to take over the Duck Lake Post Office, and so the government of the day appointed her to the position of Post Mistress, both to fill the position, and to assist her with a means to raise their four children.

There are many more newspaper clippings and bits of information that I did not include in the first edition, but hope that at some point, I can create a more comprehensive edition for family members.

I am hoping to attend one of my colleague’s community meetings tomorrow. We also have lunch plans with my grandma and extended family on her side and have been invited to attend church services this weekend as well.  Although we are religious – I attend catholic schools and Matt attended the United church as children, we have not been affiliated with any church for a number of years, and instead, attend different church on an ad-hoc basis or when we are invited and when it works.

Anyway, that’s it for the day – a little insight into one of my non-political or community interests. Researching has certainly provided me with a good skill set in organizing, researching, cross-referencing records, patience (this is a very slow hobby – it took me ten years to find and verify the name of my great-grandfather on my father’s side – which now leaves me stuck at the next generation), and endurance.

 

Tell Me About It:

Please enter this code:    captcha